100 years since prohibition. Two of the finest London Speakeasies.

100 years since prohibition. Two of the finest London Speakeasies.

On January 16, 1920, brewing and selling alcoholic beverages became illegal in the United States as the 18th Amendment to the Constitution went into effect.

After doing some office research into this ‘noble experiment’ we learnt a lot around the culture of the period.

An interesting discovery for us was the recently found images and vintage adverts pulled from the archives.

100 years since prohibition. Two of the finest London Speakeasies. Say Make Mine with BACARDI.jpeg

These newly discovered images  were used during prohibition in Cuba, when American and tourists flocked to the ‘wet’ island. Cuba, synonymous with with rum, saw prohibition in America catapult rum and the BACARDÍ brand into success.

100 years since prohibition. Two of the finest London Speakeasies -Bacardi Archives

To celebrate 100 years of prohibition and to offer up something different for a not-so-Dry January, we wanted to recommend two of the finest London Speakeasies and our choice of cocktail for each.

Two of the finest London Speakeasies – BARTS

Step back in time to the 1929 prohibition-era, as you enter the apartment-turned-speakeasy of the prolific Chicago gangster ‘Uncle Barts’. A bygone era of debauchery, glamour and hedonism, the speakeasy spirit is immortalised here. Barts is a London epicentre for unique cocktails and quenchers of the highest quality.

100 years since prohibition. Two of the finest London Speakeasies. BARTS

The Daiquirí and BACARDÍ Cocktail were originally the same cocktail with different names as the word ‘Daiquirí’ proved difficult for the Americans to pronounce? The BACARDÍ Cocktail, also called simply a “BACARDÍ” by many Americans, was comprised of BACARDÍ rum, lime, and sugar up until American bartenders began to replace the sugar with grenadine in the 1910’s, initiating a change soon recorded in cocktail books around the United States.

Two of the finest London Speakeasies – 69 COLEMORE ROW

In its 10th anniversary, 69 Colebrooke Row is one of London’s most established neighborhood bars. Identifiable by an outdoor lantern, The Bar With No Name’s Film Noir references are interplayed in both setting and cocktail menu.

100 years since prohibition. Two of the finest London Speakeasies. 69 Colebrooke Row

The French 75, a gin and champagne cocktail, first gained popularity in the US when it was published in The Savoy Cocktail Book in 1930 toward the end of Prohibition. The first documented recipe for the “75” (as it was originally named in Harry’s ABC of Mixing Cocktails published a few years after the war in 1922) called for Calvados, Gin, Absinthe and grenadine—no Champagne whatsoever. The French 75 got both its current name and official recipe a few years later in 1927 in the cocktail recipe book Here’s How! by Judge Jr., which called for Gin, lemon juice, powdered sugar and Champagne.

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